Role of the occupational health nurse

The role of the occupational health nurse as outlined by the WHO (2001) in their publication titled The Role of the Occupational Health Nurse in Workplace Health Management (Bilthoven, European Centre for Environment and Health). In this publication the WHO outlines some of the core competencies and areas of knowledge of occupational health nurses in various countries.

  • Clinician
    • Primary Prevention.
    • Emergency Care.
    • Treatment Services.
    • Nursing Diagnosis.
    • Individual and group care plan.
    • General health advice and assessment.
    • Research and the use of evidence based practice.
  • Specialist
    • Occupational health policy, practice development, implementation and evaluation.
    • Occupational health assessment.
    • Health surveillance.
    • Sickness absence management.
    • Rehabilitation.
    • Maintenance of work ability.
    • Health and safety.
    • Hazard identification.
    • Risk assessment.
    • Advice on control strategies.
    • Research and use of evidence based practice.
    • Ethics.
  • Manager
    • Management.
    • Administration.
    • Budget planning.
    • Marketing.
    • Service level agreements.
    • Quality assurance.
    • Professional audit.
    • Continuing professional development.
  • Co-ordinator
    • Occupational health team.
    • Worker education and training.
    • Environmental health management.
  • Advisor
    • To management and staff on issues related to workplace health management.
    • As a conduit to other external health or social agencies.
  • Health Educator
    • Workplace health promotion.
  • Counsellor
    • Counselling and reflective listening skills.
    • Problem solving skills.
  • Researcher
    • Health needs assessment.
    • Research skills.
    • Evidence based practice.
    • Epidemiology.